Lament for the Separated

hand holding istockphotoThis is the pastoral prayer I gave on Sunday (Father’s Day) in response to current crises along our borders. I offer this as a prayer to share with people of faith everywhere, for truly we should lament the suffering of others, and ask for mercy for the silent ways we unwittingly cause harm. Based on Psalm 130:

Out of the depths we cry to you, O GOD.

God, hear our voice! 

Let your ears be attentive to the voice of our supplications! 

This morning we are celebrating the love that fathers have for their children, and the never-ending love you have for us, your children.

We remember the special times we may have had with fathers in our midst – our earthly fathers and people who have come alongside to serve as role models and guides to us.

  We struggle in our hearts and in our churches to know the truth of what is happening to other fathers and mothers and their children along the borders of our country:  Open our hearts to the voices of the world.

  We confess that too often the church has been little more than a silent witness to evil deeds:    We have prayed without protest, and without action for justice.   As we remain silent, we have been made complicit in the cries of the hurting.     Lord, have mercy upon us. 

We wait for God, our souls waits, and in God’s word we hope;    

In the midst of our lament we may give thanks –    for pastors and laity who have raised courageous voices; for humanitarian groups who have come to the aid of others, for people who continue to bear witness to the Gospel  under intense pressure and fear, for public officials who have challenged unjust policies risking reputation and career. The Gospel witness has not been completely silenced, and we are grateful.   

Our soul waits for God more than those who watch for the morning,  More than those who watch for the morning, we wait. 

Today we call for humility and courage to accept the futility of our current path.   Today we cry out for creativity to seek new paths of peacemaking and hospitality.  

O People, hope in GOD!

May we join protest to prayer, support ministries of compassion, and cast off the fear that has made us feel helpless in the face of injustice. May we return again to the way of Jesus. May heartbreak end and cries be transformed to the harmonies of justice and the melodies of peace. 

For with GOD there is steadfast love, and great power to redeem. 

For this we yearn, for this we pray, and toward this end we rededicate ourselves as children of a loving God who gives food to the hungry, drink to the thirsty, and welcome to the stranger.

O GOD, redeem your People from all iniquities, as we pray for your kingdom to come on earth as it heaven praying as Jesus taught, saying, “Our Father….”.

 

Be blessed today and always,

Rev. Erin

 

Giving credit where credit is due: To read more about Psalm 130, check it out on Biblegateway.com. Thank you to this website for inspiring my prayer of lament.

Central Texas Conference Responds to Migrant Children Crisis in emergency resolution

With the addition of a last minute emergency resolution, the 2018 Central Texas Annual Conference closed its items of business with a response to the proposed tent cities for migrant children. By voice vote, the delegation overwhelmingly supports the following response:

“Central Texas Annual Conference Response to Proposed Tent Cities for Migrant Children

Whereas The United Methodist Church, in our Social Principles, “recognizes, embraces, and affirms all persons, regardless of country of origin, as members of the family of God.” And “We urge society to ‘recognize the gifts, contributions and struggles of those who are immigrants and to advocate for justice for all.'”

Whereas Holy Scripture in Exodus, Leviticus, and Deuteronomy call us to love sojourners, as indeed the Israelites were, as ourselves and to work for the redemption of the most vulnerable.

Whereas our UMC Social Principles in The Book of Resolutions of The United Methodist Church state that “Any legislation to reform the US immigration system must affirm the worth, dignity, and inherent value and rights of migrants, and must also include: eliminations of indefinite detention, incarceration of children, and the expanding prison population.”

Whereas Bishop Mike McKee expressed grave concerns in Sunday evening’s worship for the separation of children from parents at our borders

Whereas Bishop Mike Lowry has also called for immigration reform

Whereas the Fort Worth Star-Telegram and other news organizations have just reported a plan to house migrant children, separated from their parents, in tent cities near El Paso.

Therefore, be it resolved that the Central Texas Annual Conference states our opposition to this inhumane treatment of God’s most vulnerable persons – children.

Be it further resolved that the delegates of the Central Texas Annual Conference affirm the value of all persons and support the humane treatment of all vulnerable persons.

Submitted by

Jerrilyn Woodard-Entrekin, Lay Delegate from First United Methodist Church of Arlington”

I am partial to this handwritten, quickly drafted response because I was able to witness youth and young adults discussing its writing before it was presented to the larger body. The author of the response, Jerrilyn Woodard-Entrekin, wrote it during the conference between morning break and lunch, knowing she did not have much time.

Jerrilyn graciously allowed youth leaders to get a preview of the draft, and they discussed the importance of the response with youth over lunch. Appropriately, this timely discussion was over lunch in the back room of World Cup Cafe in Waco, Texas, at a table of Central Texas Youth and young adults. How beautiful is it to consider that these young people were surrounded by a fair trade market full of items that offer dignity and a living wage to people from around the world!

I love that it was discussed as a teachable moment youth and young adults – not the “church of the future,” but the church of the now. I love that it was discussed over a meal in a restaurant that helps develop dignity for “all persons, regardless of country of origin, as members of the family of God.” I love that the author did not hesitate to do God’s work, but instead submitted a handwritten response quickly photocopied and distributed after lunch.

Let there be no confusion, separating small children from their parents and housing them indefinitely in tent cities/detention centers will traumatize and harm the most vulnerable. As people of faith – as moms and dads, as people of compassion and understanding, as people obligated to offer mercy to the the least, as people who have ever loved children – we have an obligation to speak out for the protection of the most vulnerable.

The Holy Spirit is alive and well in the Church, and I am hopeful for our future. God is good, y’all.

(And now we have work to do.)

Blessings,
Rev. Erin

 

Mission and Art Workshops

Not too many years ago, I was struggling to find my sense of identity. Much to my surprise, I uncovered a wellspring of joy when I was given the opportunity to put a paintbrush in my hand. I fell in love again with painting and creating, and the process helped me to discover my way in ministry. There is something soothing, healing and empowering that can be found in the act of creation. For me, a path to lightness and health was uncovered through art. What a joy it is to be in a ministry that allows me a space to use my gifts and talents – I now have the privilege of guiding others on this journey through “Mission and Art Workshops.”

For the last few weeks, it has been a joy to lead weekly art workshops in our local Salvation Army shelter. The shelter is a haven for families, and many of the residents have also found themselves to be in dark places, struggling to find their own identities.

Each resident’s story is different, and I hope to get to learn the stories in time. Many of the women here are homeless because they have fled unhealthy relationships, domestic violence. The shelter creates a safe place to land temporarily as these parents begin to rediscover their individual senses of identity.

This is where the “Mission and Art” ministry steps in. As we gather together, we share small stories about our lives and get to know one another. We pray, read Scripture and create. We talk about really important things and we laugh about silly things. It is a sacred space for women to gather. So far we have played with mixed media art, acrylics, and watercolor painting.

 

The rules are simple here:

  1. Accept that you are an artist. We were all created in the image of a creative God – we are each inherently creative!
  2. Have fun and play.
  3. Be kind to yourself and others. No criticizing words for your own artwork or for others allowed.
  4. Do art for the process. Know that you will create whatever you were meant to create here – and that is enough. There are no mistakes, no mess-ups, no perfection allowed.

It is my prayer that through our times of creating art together, the women of this shelter will enjoy moments of celebrating their innate creativity and enjoying one another’s company. May the work be empowering, healing and stepping toward wholeness.

 

 

 

 

Here are a few examples of the beauty that is being created here:

If you have been inspired by this post and would like to learn more about the Mission and Art ministry, feel free to contact me at erin@nwumc.org. Be blessed today!

7 Soul Care Practices You May Need Today

I can’t even look today.

I don’t know about you, but I can’t even bring myself to look at the newsfeed today. I have seen enough to know that the news cycle is devastating. This morning my sweet husband told me all I needed to know to know that this will be a news cycle filled with heartbreak, pain, theories, hurt, blame, politicizing and brokenness. There will be images of the aftermath, biographies of the deceased. Today’s cycle will be inevitably be followed with posts of division, conspiracy theories, differing political arguments about gun control, violence, mental illness, and more finger pointing. My soul can’t take this today.

Instead, I humbly offer to you 7 soul care practices you might need today:

  1. Avoid the media/your newsfeed for a while. I understand the temptation to try to understand how something so unspeakable could happen. There is a primal need to understand evil and understand threats to our well-being. But taking in too much bad news will inevitably hurt your soul. I am hanging on to these words from Philippians: “Whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable – if anything is excellent or praiseworthy- think about such things.”
  2. Go for a walk. Take time to enjoy nature and to appreciate the beauty around you. Where do you recognize beauty? Is it the sunshine? flowers? birds? breeze? Take a deep breath and enjoy this, never taking it for granted. “The heavens declare the glory of God; the skies proclaim the work of his hands.”
  3. Consider the goodness of God. When facing evil, it may be tempting to forget the goodness of God. What is it that you know about God to still be true? God is still good, God is still love, God is never leaving nor forsaking you. “Oh give thanks to the Lord, for he is good, for his steadfast love endures forever.”
  4. Spend time with a friend or with family. This is a good moment to call a friend to talk to them. Eat a meal together. Just be around people who care about you. “A friend loves at all times, and a brother is born for adversity.”
  5. Give and receive hugs. This would be a good day to give hugs to people. We need physical comfort and care. Be sure to hug your loved ones today. “Let us love one another.”
  6. Pray. Maybe this should be the first one on a list for soul care because prayer is essential for your soul’s wellbeing. Don’t just post that your “thoughts and prayers are with the victims,” spend time quietly devoted to prayer. Pray for peace, pray for comfort, pray for an end to senseless violence. Pray continuously. “Do not be anxious about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God.”
  7. Work for justice and mercy. We might not be able to help in the specific situation today, we do not have the power to undo the evil that has already happened, but we can find small ways to work for justice and mercy in the places around us. “…and what does the Lord require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God?”

I wish I could end this post with an explanation about why bad things happen to good people. I wish I could explain why evil exists. I just don’t know the answers, but I do know that we will be okay. We can have hope for the future. We need to hang on to that hope today…and we need to love one another.

Who needs to hear a message of hope from you today?

Be blessed,

Erin