Lament for the Separated

hand holding istockphotoThis is the pastoral prayer I gave on Sunday (Father’s Day) in response to current crises along our borders. I offer this as a prayer to share with people of faith everywhere, for truly we should lament the suffering of others, and ask for mercy for the silent ways we unwittingly cause harm. Based on Psalm 130:

Out of the depths we cry to you, O GOD.

God, hear our voice! 

Let your ears be attentive to the voice of our supplications! 

This morning we are celebrating the love that fathers have for their children, and the never-ending love you have for us, your children.

We remember the special times we may have had with fathers in our midst – our earthly fathers and people who have come alongside to serve as role models and guides to us.

  We struggle in our hearts and in our churches to know the truth of what is happening to other fathers and mothers and their children along the borders of our country:  Open our hearts to the voices of the world.

  We confess that too often the church has been little more than a silent witness to evil deeds:    We have prayed without protest, and without action for justice.   As we remain silent, we have been made complicit in the cries of the hurting.     Lord, have mercy upon us. 

We wait for God, our souls waits, and in God’s word we hope;    

In the midst of our lament we may give thanks –    for pastors and laity who have raised courageous voices; for humanitarian groups who have come to the aid of others, for people who continue to bear witness to the Gospel  under intense pressure and fear, for public officials who have challenged unjust policies risking reputation and career. The Gospel witness has not been completely silenced, and we are grateful.   

Our soul waits for God more than those who watch for the morning,  More than those who watch for the morning, we wait. 

Today we call for humility and courage to accept the futility of our current path.   Today we cry out for creativity to seek new paths of peacemaking and hospitality.  

O People, hope in GOD!

May we join protest to prayer, support ministries of compassion, and cast off the fear that has made us feel helpless in the face of injustice. May we return again to the way of Jesus. May heartbreak end and cries be transformed to the harmonies of justice and the melodies of peace. 

For with GOD there is steadfast love, and great power to redeem. 

For this we yearn, for this we pray, and toward this end we rededicate ourselves as children of a loving God who gives food to the hungry, drink to the thirsty, and welcome to the stranger.

O GOD, redeem your People from all iniquities, as we pray for your kingdom to come on earth as it heaven praying as Jesus taught, saying, “Our Father….”.

 

Be blessed today and always,

Rev. Erin

 

Giving credit where credit is due: To read more about Psalm 130, check it out on Biblegateway.com. Thank you to this website for inspiring my prayer of lament.

Central Texas Conference Overwhelmingly Rejects “One Man, One Woman” Resolution

img_5653-1On June 13, at the 2018 Central Texas Annual Conference meeting in Waco, Texas, delegates overwhelmingly voted to reject an “Aspirational Resolution” presented to the body by Dr. Tom Robbins and Dr. Dean Posey. After tense debate limited to 3 speakers for and 3 speakers against the resolution, and a paper ballot vote, the statement of resolution was overwhelmingly rejected 385 to 267.

The text of the rejected resolution follows:

“Aspirational Resolution

Whereas, the large majority of United Methodists as represented by the most recent General Conference continue to affirm the sanctity of marriage as it exists only between one man and one woman,

And whereas, approximately 95% of worldwide Christians affirm the same,

And whereas, the adoption of the “One Church Plan” would change our definition of marriage from one man and one woman to any “two adults,”

And whereas, this would isolate United Methodist from the worldwide Christian community and isolate American United Methodists from the great majority of Global United Methodists,

img_5651-1And whereas, we believe the Bible is normative for defining our sexual ethics,

And whereas, many faithful United Methodist pastors and laity would feel compelled to leave a church that adopted a definition of marriage that compromised their closely held beliefs,

And whereas, those beliefs have been considered the orthodox doctrine of the Christian church for 2000 years,

Be it resolved, the Central Texas Annual Conference aspires to be a conference who affirms the historic, traditional, and Biblical definition of a marriage as being one man and one woman, 

And be it further resolved, we aspire to have a General Conference delegation to the called 2019 session of General Conference that at least proportionally reflects the vote of this aspirational resolution affirming our historic, traditional, and Biblical witness of marriage.

Submitted by Dr. Tom Robbins and Dr. Dean Posey”

Impartial observers may have expected that, in a Red State like Texas, especially within a generally more conservative Conference, with the typical conference attendee being older and more conservative, this resolution would have been a slam dunk. Having the resolution rejected overwhelmingly, however, is surprising news. There are different opinions on the complex issues of faith and human sexuality, but at this point it seems clear that, even in this part of the country, a substantial majority is ready to move forward together.

With a simple “Yes” or “No” vote and limited discussion beforehand, it’s also unclear as to which parts of the resolution were cause for its rejection:

  • Delegates may have rejected it due to the harm this statement would cause to an already marginalized people, especially the LGBTQ community.
  • Another potential cause of its rejection could be the unsubstantiated claims contained within the resolution statement, such as “the large majority of United Methodists…continue to affirm the sanctity of marriage as it exists” and “approximately 95% of worldwide Christians assert the same.”  
  • Delegates may have rejected its Scriptural claims such as “the Bible is normative for defining our sexual ethics”
  • Many may simply reject the last paragraph altogether and the prospect of re-electing a General Conference delegation based on pre-determined theological stances.

It’s not possible to know at this point how much each factor played in the resolution’s rejection.

After seeing this vote in action, I am hopeful that we can move forward in a way that offers Christ’s unconditional love, grace, and human dignity to all people, even those with whom we disagree.

Finding the Common Ground

“Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable — if anything is excellent or praiseworthy — think about such things.” -Philippians 4:8

Which side are you on? Would you say you are on the left or on the right?

As I look through my Facebook friends, my community, my congregation, my extended family – there is so much pressure to pick a side on all the issues. Which issue concerns you the most today? Racial violence? Discrimination? Gay marriage? Immigration? Refugee Crisis? Climate change? Poverty? Employment? McGregor vs. Mayweather?

No question, one glance at the news and you know there are plenty of reasons to be up in arms about something. There are sides that are right and sides that are wrong. We view the world through our personal perspective and cannot understand how anyone can be outraged in a way that is different than our own flavor of outrage. Clearly, your side is right and the other side is wrong, right? It’s tough when people you genuinely love, family members even, feel compelled to share opinions that seem so hurtful and wrong to you. It’s crazy making when total lies are passed on as truth, and no one seems to be questioning things.

I don’t know about you, but I’m just tired of feeling like I have to pick sides on issues, and feeling I need to be either outraged or fearful all of the time. There are definitely reasons to be outraged. I feel manipulated by the news, whether it’s fake news or real news. It’s just exhausting.

But what if there is another option? What if we don’t have to be divided about everything?

As a pastor, I serve a wide range of people. I mean a crazy wide range of people. In my congregation, I have gun-carrying NRA members sitting near pacifist gun control advocates, LGBTQ couples and allies sitting next to gay rights opponents, self-identified liberals and conservatives…name a division, it’s in my congregation. I tiptoe through this socio-political minefield as a pastor and pray to bring God’s words of hope and truth in a faithful, God-honoring way. I try to find our common ground as humans and Christ followers in the midst of a media culture that is determined to instill fear, hopelessness and division.

Finding common ground is an uphill battle, friends, but not an unsurmountable one.

What is our common ground? We worship a God of hope. A God who promises to never leave us nor forsake us. A God who brings redemption to oppressed people. As Christ followers, we can know the deep peace, love, and grace that is offered freely to us. As forgiven people, we have the power and freedom to resist evil, injustice, and oppression in whatever forms they present themselves. We can be a people of hope in a culture that really needs it.

We also have a beautiful opportunity to love others through trying to understand their perspectives. We don’t have to agree on everything, but we can bring steps closer to reconciliation by opening our hearts and minds to hearing how God is at work in the hearts and minds of others. We can listen to one another for the things that are true, noble, right, pure, lovely and admirable. I’ve found that the more I listen to people who are different, really listen, the more I have to see our common humanity. Divisive “issues” slip away when we see the humanity in others.

Let’s go listen to one another in love.

Blessings,

Erin

  • Who do you need to reach out to in order to understand their struggles better?
  • Who can you invite to coffee/lunch/dinner this week to get to know better?
  • Where do you find hope?