Central Texas Conference Responds to Migrant Children Crisis in emergency resolution

With the addition of a last minute emergency resolution, the 2018 Central Texas Annual Conference closed its items of business with a response to the proposed tent cities for migrant children. By voice vote, the delegation overwhelmingly supports the following response:

“Central Texas Annual Conference Response to Proposed Tent Cities for Migrant Children

Whereas The United Methodist Church, in our Social Principles, “recognizes, embraces, and affirms all persons, regardless of country of origin, as members of the family of God.” And “We urge society to ‘recognize the gifts, contributions and struggles of those who are immigrants and to advocate for justice for all.'”

Whereas Holy Scripture in Exodus, Leviticus, and Deuteronomy call us to love sojourners, as indeed the Israelites were, as ourselves and to work for the redemption of the most vulnerable.

Whereas our UMC Social Principles in The Book of Resolutions of The United Methodist Church state that “Any legislation to reform the US immigration system must affirm the worth, dignity, and inherent value and rights of migrants, and must also include: eliminations of indefinite detention, incarceration of children, and the expanding prison population.”

Whereas Bishop Mike McKee expressed grave concerns in Sunday evening’s worship for the separation of children from parents at our borders

Whereas Bishop Mike Lowry has also called for immigration reform

Whereas the Fort Worth Star-Telegram and other news organizations have just reported a plan to house migrant children, separated from their parents, in tent cities near El Paso.

Therefore, be it resolved that the Central Texas Annual Conference states our opposition to this inhumane treatment of God’s most vulnerable persons – children.

Be it further resolved that the delegates of the Central Texas Annual Conference affirm the value of all persons and support the humane treatment of all vulnerable persons.

Submitted by

Jerrilyn Woodard-Entrekin, Lay Delegate from First United Methodist Church of Arlington”

I am partial to this handwritten, quickly drafted response because I was able to witness youth and young adults discussing its writing before it was presented to the larger body. The author of the response, Jerrilyn Woodard-Entrekin, wrote it during the conference between morning break and lunch, knowing she did not have much time.

Jerrilyn graciously allowed youth leaders to get a preview of the draft, and they discussed the importance of the response with youth over lunch. Appropriately, this timely discussion was over lunch in the back room of World Cup Cafe in Waco, Texas, at a table of Central Texas Youth and young adults. How beautiful is it to consider that these young people were surrounded by a fair trade market full of items that offer dignity and a living wage to people from around the world!

I love that it was discussed as a teachable moment youth and young adults – not the “church of the future,” but the church of the now. I love that it was discussed over a meal in a restaurant that helps develop dignity for “all persons, regardless of country of origin, as members of the family of God.” I love that the author did not hesitate to do God’s work, but instead submitted a handwritten response quickly photocopied and distributed after lunch.

Let there be no confusion, separating small children from their parents and housing them indefinitely in tent cities/detention centers will traumatize and harm the most vulnerable. As people of faith – as moms and dads, as people of compassion and understanding, as people obligated to offer mercy to the the least, as people who have ever loved children – we have an obligation to speak out for the protection of the most vulnerable.

The Holy Spirit is alive and well in the Church, and I am hopeful for our future. God is good, y’all.

(And now we have work to do.)

Blessings,
Rev. Erin

 

Central Texas Conference Overwhelmingly Rejects “One Man, One Woman” Resolution

img_5653-1On June 13, at the 2018 Central Texas Annual Conference meeting in Waco, Texas, delegates overwhelmingly voted to reject an “Aspirational Resolution” presented to the body by Dr. Tom Robbins and Dr. Dean Posey. After tense debate limited to 3 speakers for and 3 speakers against the resolution, and a paper ballot vote, the statement of resolution was overwhelmingly rejected 385 to 267.

The text of the rejected resolution follows:

“Aspirational Resolution

Whereas, the large majority of United Methodists as represented by the most recent General Conference continue to affirm the sanctity of marriage as it exists only between one man and one woman,

And whereas, approximately 95% of worldwide Christians affirm the same,

And whereas, the adoption of the “One Church Plan” would change our definition of marriage from one man and one woman to any “two adults,”

And whereas, this would isolate United Methodist from the worldwide Christian community and isolate American United Methodists from the great majority of Global United Methodists,

img_5651-1And whereas, we believe the Bible is normative for defining our sexual ethics,

And whereas, many faithful United Methodist pastors and laity would feel compelled to leave a church that adopted a definition of marriage that compromised their closely held beliefs,

And whereas, those beliefs have been considered the orthodox doctrine of the Christian church for 2000 years,

Be it resolved, the Central Texas Annual Conference aspires to be a conference who affirms the historic, traditional, and Biblical definition of a marriage as being one man and one woman, 

And be it further resolved, we aspire to have a General Conference delegation to the called 2019 session of General Conference that at least proportionally reflects the vote of this aspirational resolution affirming our historic, traditional, and Biblical witness of marriage.

Submitted by Dr. Tom Robbins and Dr. Dean Posey”

Impartial observers may have expected that, in a Red State like Texas, especially within a generally more conservative Conference, with the typical conference attendee being older and more conservative, this resolution would have been a slam dunk. Having the resolution rejected overwhelmingly, however, is surprising news. There are different opinions on the complex issues of faith and human sexuality, but at this point it seems clear that, even in this part of the country, a substantial majority is ready to move forward together.

With a simple “Yes” or “No” vote and limited discussion beforehand, it’s also unclear as to which parts of the resolution were cause for its rejection:

  • Delegates may have rejected it due to the harm this statement would cause to an already marginalized people, especially the LGBTQ community.
  • Another potential cause of its rejection could be the unsubstantiated claims contained within the resolution statement, such as “the large majority of United Methodists…continue to affirm the sanctity of marriage as it exists” and “approximately 95% of worldwide Christians assert the same.”  
  • Delegates may have rejected its Scriptural claims such as “the Bible is normative for defining our sexual ethics”
  • Many may simply reject the last paragraph altogether and the prospect of re-electing a General Conference delegation based on pre-determined theological stances.

It’s not possible to know at this point how much each factor played in the resolution’s rejection.

After seeing this vote in action, I am hopeful that we can move forward in a way that offers Christ’s unconditional love, grace, and human dignity to all people, even those with whom we disagree.